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Native Flags: Learn About Native Trees
 
In recent years, the subject of native plants has taken on new significance in horticulture. Some reasons for this significance include the loss of natural areas to development, coastal deterioration due to disturbance of native vegetation, and concern about excessive water use to support exotic landscapes composed of introduced species.

Three factors make native plants favorable to use.
 
Energy efficiency: Because native plants are adapted to specific soils, temperatures, and rainfall patterns, they require less irrigation and fertilization. This claim is true if several factors are present, specifically providing the right native with the right soil type and irrigation amount. Oftentimes in development, water flow patterns change as a result of native topsoil removal.
 
Low maintenance: Native plants are resistant to pests and diseases in their native environments, because they evolved under constant exposure to these organisms. Invasive plants may not have this resistance, providing an unwanted food source to pests and disease, and could compete with native plants for water and soil area.
 
Education about ecology: The general populace should be more educated about their natural resources and how these resources are preserved. This education can come from seeing native trees in parks, state and national parks, and forested areas and understanding how these trees interact with their environments and provide the clean air, water, and soil that residents rely on.

FIU College of Architecture + The Arts


Xavier Cortada
Artist-in-Residence
Florida International University
College of Architecture + The Arts
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 430
Miami Beach, FL 33139

Xavier Cortada's participatory art practice is based at Florida International University.






FLOR500

 Reclamation Project






 NYFA sponsored-artist participatory eco-art projects

 

Native Flags   


 


  

 

 

 

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